flipped

edited March 2014 in Rambler
ok 2 times now and the first one was really stupid. hit the driveway (has a slight curb) at an angle and it rolled over..out again today..make a left hand turn going slowly and did it again! beginning to think i need to find a lower bike!! :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

Comments

  • Make sure you are leaning into your turns. This will help eliminate any flipping. Stay safe!!!
    Kelli B
    Sales, TerraTrike
  • watch this video, it shows it well how you need to lean into your turns, you can not just sit upright and turn.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-mwfLN_hJs
  • i was leaning. however, the ground was not level so that made the difference.
  • The guy in that video is leaning way more than I ever have and I haven't flipped. I will count my lucky stars.
  • Howdy, I have a Rover 3 spd. and I flipped twice on the same day and I almost laphed :shock: . So if you take a curb, slow down to a crawel and take the curb,or go into the cutb directly. Ik even tride to go up on the slope curb slowly and parallel with the road, that worked. Keep Triking :D
    Happy Trails Mark and Julia An From El Mirage AZ.
  • OK, new owner and new user. Had to share my novicehood with you. (Kelli, where do I find my serial number on a rambler?) One week after I get my new trike, and one day after I pick up my new helmet, I'm heading down my gravel road. A brief encounter with a motorcycle friend gets me thinking about how fast I can go. So,I am going downhill, peddling, and at 26mph, I encounter a shimmy in the front. (I know, Kelli, relax my grip I found out.) So, I decide to pull over to check out, and 2seconds later I'm in the ditch with the trike on top of me. (Note to self: Be aware of soft shoulders, especially at higher speeds). Trike is fine, head is fine, but a nasty gash on my calf from the front sprocket' I think. How many remember the ABC sports "agony of defeat" guy. Back on today for 5 miles, which is good for not biking in 25 years. :oops: OK, stop laughing now.
  • Drofnats wrote:
    OK, new owner and new user. Had to share my novicehood with you. (Kelli, where do I find my serial number on a rambler?) One week after I get my new trike, and one day after I pick up my new helmet, I'm heading down my gravel road. A brief encounter with a motorcycle friend gets me thinking about how fast I can go. So,I am going downhill, peddling, and at 26mph, I encounter a shimmy in the front. (I know, Kelli, relax my grip I found out.) So, I decide to pull over to check out, and 2seconds later I'm in the ditch with the trike on top of me. (Note to self: Be aware of soft shoulders, especially at higher speeds). Trike is fine, head is fine, but a nasty gash on my calf from the front sprocket' I think. How many remember the ABC sports "agony of defeat" guy. Back on today for 5 miles, which is good for not biking in 25 years. :oops: OK, stop laughing now.

    I found my serial number stamped into the housing right under the front crank.
  • la2781 wrote:
    i was leaning. however, the ground was not level so that made the difference.

    remember these trikes are built to be light weight too.
    so having your center of gravity off a little bit is going to pull the trike right over if not leaning enough when turning.
    even street luge riders flip and they are about 2 inches off the ground lying flat on their backs.
    or you could hang about 5 blocks of concrete from your frame and you wont flip, but your light weight trike would weight about 300 pounds... :lol:
  • Correct. Bottom side of bottom bracket.
    Kelli B
    Sales, TerraTrike
  • Got many thousands of miles on my Rover, and have never even lifted a wheel on it, and it is higher than the Rambler. You are either not leaning properly or you are turning on an off camber hill ( banked the wrong way).
  • I was turning around on our paved trail on my Rover when the front tire dropped off the pavement and over I went. Traveling at almost 0 MPH!. Rovers and Ramblers have a higher center of gravity. This, together with the fact they have a higher weight capacity and are often are ridden by heavier riders compounds the "top heavy" condition and makes leaning into turns been more important. Ride them like you are on a go kart!
  • The Rambler is high and can be unstable, however, it is very easy to make rider position adjustments. I have moved my seat and boom forward and back to find the most comfortable and stable ride. I have found that an inch or two can make a world of differance in trike stability. Try making an adjustment probably back an inch or so if you are lifting a wheel to often in turns. I hope this helps.
  • Don't forget to check your tie-rod adjustment occasionally, with tires fully-inflated, as improper adjustment can lead to "lift-off".
    I tore my rotator cuff this Spring due to improper adjustment and the resulting 'slow-roll' (my own fault).
    Velo Verde Recumbent, Cargo and Electric Bikes
    TerraTrike Premier Dealer
    6791 Sebastopol Ave
    Sebastopol, CA 95472
    707.823.3227
    www.veloverde.net
  • I've been riding my 24 speed Rambler since the end of August without any problem. Until yesterday. I was going downhill on a curve and misjudged my speed. Hit the brakes, unevenly, and was flipped right out, onto my rear end onto the concrete. OUCH!!! I'm recovering; however, I'm 68 years old and my bones don't need that kind of impact. It took about 45 minutes to recover from the shock and be able to stand without dizziness. It was necessary to get back onto the trike and ride it back home, in pain. Today I was prepared to ride, although still in pain, but my partner (thankfully I was with a partner when the accident happened) felt it was too early to start again. Will try again tomorrow.
  • kiltedpig wrote:
    I recently rode a Rover, Rambler, Tour II and a Greenspeed in my quest to find a trike. I rode the same course that included a parking lot and a long downhill with a slight left turn at the bottom. Not a large or steep hill, just a hill in the parking lot to the street. There is a huge difference in the feel of them when turning, the higher center of gravity and the feeling I got made me rule out the Rover and Rambler. I'm 66 so I am no speed demon but the thought of rolling over on a large downhill run rules out saving a few dollars. Still deciding between the Tour II, Sportster and the Greenspeed. Price rules out the higher end trikes.

    You can flip any Trike, even at very slow speeds, if you don't lean into the turn. Got about 17, 000 on my Rover, with zero problems with flipping.
  • This is one of the limitations of the tadpole design. I did a flip but was able to brace with my arm just going around an off camber turn at a very slow speed. it is not enough to just lean into the turns as I found out last summer when riding my Rambler in the Coulees of SW WIsconsin. I descended several longish, 2-3 mile, hills and learned that you really need to sit forward and lean over the inside wheel especially at high speeds and around tight corners. You have to get those abs working and put your chin over inside axle. I see quite a few trike riders without helmets and encourage everyone to wear one. This kind of flip at any speed could cause catastrophic injuries if the rider is unlucky enough to land wrong.
  • RingLady wrote:
    I was telling my roommate about my desire to buy a Terra Trike. She immediately talked about flips. I took it with a grain of salt and mentioned that two wheelers fall over too.

    True, but two wheelers become more stable as speed increases. The flip issue with all tadpole trikes is related directly to the design and while it is easy to counter and avoid flips they will happen if the rider is unaware or does not lean. The other area for me that raises safety concerns with the Rambler or any recumbent is the need for a left hand mirror. I can easily turn and get a good look on a two wheeler but the seating position on recumbents makes this very difficult. No reason to not ride a recumbent just a limitation of the design that requires action by the rider to stay safe.
  • jeffacme wrote:
    RingLady wrote:
    I was telling my roommate about my desire to buy a Terra Trike. She immediately talked about flips. I took it with a grain of salt and mentioned that two wheelers fall over too.

    True, but two wheelers become more stable as speed increases. The flip issue with all tadpole trikes is related directly to the design and while it is easy to counter and avoid flips they will happen if the rider is unaware or does not lean. The other area for me that raises safety concerns with the Rambler or any recumbent is the need for a left hand mirror. I can easily turn and get a good look on a two wheeler but the seating position on recumbents makes this very difficult. No reason to not ride a recumbent just a limitation of the design that requires action by the rider to stay safe.

    I use two mirrors on my Trike, one on either handlebar. The alternative is to use a mirror like a Take alook mirror and attach it to your glasses or helmet. Never had a problem seeing behind me either on a bike or trike.
  • My point was more that the flipping issue is a real design limitation and anyone riding a TT trike should be aware of the fact that tadpole trikes flip if the rider does not counter the tendency. As to mirrors, never use them with bikes as I prefer turning around to take a good look. I also do not see the need for two mirrors on a trike as all the danger comes form the left and one well placed mirror covers at least two lanes.
  • Any vehicle, human or motor powered has its limitations. We can flip anything, it's just knowing where that line is and how to avoid it. Or, for me, how to come as close as possible to line without crossing it ;) Each trike out there is different in it's ability to easily flip or not. Get to know how you and your trike fit together; you body paired with your trike can be completely different than someone else with the same trike.

    When we were testing out the all terrain package that will soon be available for the Rambler, most of the tall guys here could easily hop on two wheels to get the trike over a barrier. When I, being 5'4," tried it, I had to too put forth almost all the effort I had to pick up that one wheel.

    My point being that yes, trikes can tip/flip and it's good to be aware of; don't be scared of it, only learn how you and your trike work together.

    One or two mirrors, it doesn't matter to me, as long as you feel safe and are aware of those around you. I know we see riders all over that prefer different accessories and options that I wouldn't want, or only dream of having some day.

    Be safe out there, but mostly have fun! :D
    Lydia R.
    Customer Service Manager
    TerraTrike - Part of the Solution
  • wow I guess I pretty blessed ive taken some mean left and right turns on mine at 20 +, never paid any attention whether or not im leaning into it or not maybe just came naturally and never had to think about it, my riding partner on the other hand has flipped his kmx a few times and its lot lower than my rover..
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