Ever Ride a Recumbent Bicycle?

I saw a tandem recumbent bicycle while still living down south. It looked really comfortable to ride but you sat much higher off the ground.

Balance is not yet a problem for me. I would love an opportunity to try riding one. Of course, there's no dealer for miles around here.

Comments

  • Recumbent bikes are significantly more comfortable then a conventional bike and would be easier to transport vs a trike. They are a bit more difficult to stop and start pedaling.
  • I have never ridden one. I went right to the trikes partly for safety reasons.
    I'm not saying two wheelers are inherently unsafe but I have had spills on icy roads. Fortunately I didn't have a car close behind me then.
  • I owned two 2 wheel recumbents a Bikee and a Rans Tailwind. One day on the Tailwind, about 7 years ago, I took a bad fall on a wet wooden bridge on one of the trails I ride all the time, when the front wheel just slid out from under me. . Many two wheelers have fallen on that same bridge when it is damp. The week after that, I ordered my Rover. Haven't been on a two wheeled bike since then.
  • Wet wood is bad, there's usually a mold/mildew layer and that contribute to the slippery surface. We have a problem on one trail that uses a significant amount of boardwalks and between the mold and decaying leaves in the fall it gets very slick in spots. Not much available to combat the condition.
  • TCEd wrote: »
    Wet wood is bad, there's usually a mold/mildew layer and that contribute to the slippery surface. We have a problem on one trail that uses a significant amount of boardwalks and between the mold and decaying leaves in the fall it gets very slick in spots. Not much available to combat the condition.

    Another cyclist and I were discussing this same problem today, and he said that he has seen chicken wire placed on wooden bike paths that eliminated the problem.
  • I put more than 25,000 miles on my previous RANS Stratus XP. My current one has only 3000 miles on it. Before that I put few thousand on other recumbent bikes. They were all much more comfortable than the road and mountain bikes that I had previously ridden. I switched to recumbents about 15 years ago. Before buying a Rambler AT, I had Catrike Road and put 4000 miles on it. I enjoy both 2 and 3 wheel recumbents. Gordon
  • @Gordon_O

    many miles! what is your impression of the road vs. the AT?

  • edited August 2017
    Captainbob wrote: »
    TCEd wrote: »
    Wet wood is bad, there's usually a mold/mildew layer and that contribute to the slippery surface. We have a problem on one trail that uses a significant amount of boardwalks and between the mold and decaying leaves in the fall it gets very slick in spots. Not much available to combat the condition.

    Another cyclist and I were discussing this same problem today, and he said that he has seen chicken wire placed on wooden bike paths that eliminated the problem.

    That is a very temporary fix and in the snow belt wouldn't work. Plus we have a lot of boardwalk sections.
  • You get mold on concrete, also, especially in SW Florida when the sprinklers run onto the sidewalk along with soil. You should see the scar on my knee from sliding on it while walking.

    I've seen wooden bridges with that tread material they often put on stairs. Would that solve the problem or would that tread material not hold to the wood for a long time?
  • You get mold on concrete, also, especially in SW Florida when the sprinklers run onto the sidewalk along with soil. You should see the scar on my knee from sliding on it while walking.

    I've seen wooden bridges with that tread material they often put on stairs. Would that solve the problem or would that tread material not hold to the wood for a long time?

    We have found that power washing helps but you need a water source plus we have a extensive boardwalk system. Actually the sun helps during part of the year when the rays hit the wood directly. In the fall and spring we use leaf blowers to move the debris off and eliminate their mess.

    Trail maintenance is a significant workload and our trails are all non-profit with volunteers, no city, county help.
  • If anybody has a recumbent 2 wheeler in Michigan they want to get rid of, please let me know. My DF-riding wife has agreed to TRY a recumbent, on the condition that it has 2 wheels.

    She only agreed to this after doing a 70 mile ride on her cruiser DF (Electra Townie 21D) and having back pains.
  • One 65 year old man came up along side us riding a Sun two wheel. Can't
    really call it a recumbent. Had a long
    seat. We recognized him from previous trips north. Usually rides a DF but his
    smile had been hurting so he bought a
    $300 one. Couldn't swing for TT. He looked at them. Retired and lives alone we gather. Rides a lot.
  • JamesR,
    Take a look at my long review in the Rambler All Terrain topic category.
    Gordon
  • He could always put training wheels on it and have a kind of trike!

    The price is sure good!

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