Lights

How many of yous irregular visitors here have lights on yor trikes?
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Comments

  • daytime,no - if they cant see my hiviz uniform, they wont be seeing lights despite treks dubious research.

    nighttime 2x400 lumen headlights, 2 blinkies aft along with reflective stuff sides and rear - too many unlighted 2-wheelers and pedestrians milling about after the sun goes down.
  • I don't ride at night, however I have a rear light that can be easily attached and I have two of those lights with straps that go on your head. One will go on my head and one on the front of the trike. They are only for an emergency when I got stuck out after dark. I also have a set of those disposable blinkers in case I break down and need to be seen at night.
  • edited August 26
    Use lights all the time on the MUT's I ride on. So do many other users. Can see another rider, at a much greater distance, especially in wooded areas on a curvy trail.
  • White strobe front, Red HotShot (best) strobe on Rear. Much better than original Bell Units. Both USB recharge, both flashing. Good for 8 hours. Don't ride at night
  • I ride mostly on multi use trails and occasionally on public roads and avoid night riding. Have one front white and rear red light, both have flash and stationary settings.
    Making your trike look like a Christmas tree isn't necessarily a good thing as a bunch of lights can be distracting and confuse a driver.
  • USB rechargeable lights would be great! You can take one of those chargers with you that recharge phones and you'd never be without lights.
  • Do what you feel is safe, or not. If it is not worth $200 in lighting & safety gear, or to see where you are going, then that is your decision.

    If your head gets slammed up against metal, get thrown for 50 feet after an impact, get drug for a mile with nothing to protect your hands, feet, head, knees - that is your decision. If you have no value for your life, ride like a fool.

    Figure people are given common sense. It's those that don't use it that causes accidents, both vehicle drivers and the cyclists.
    Things happen: distractions, sun light, thoughts going through one's head, stuff inside the car, GPS mapping, traffic, time, running late, ect. ~ Want to have an edge to be maybe be seen? Anxious to see of there is an afterlife?


    LBS suggested the Bontrager Flare R, only one. I went back for another, and asked about the front lights. He did not try to sell me on either. It was more of the comments I got from running the Flares in the rear that I went with one up front.
    LBS' concern was for my safety. No regrets, although maybe one Flare was all that was needed.

    Would like to had another front light though, to see better at night with. Can always turn one off to take in the night.

    Bought two of those Harbor Freight 24 LED lights to eventually put on the Rover cross bars for front carriage lighting. Also run a blue LED strobe on the front to give more side-to-side effects.
    Would like to get two steady red lights the width of the trike - thus why I made a light bar. Once I can create a way to attach a Flare to the headrest angled bar then will go looking for two steady lights for the end of the light bar at night.


    Rode motorcycles and scooters for over 20 years. One time I added a strobe-brake-light to the back end of Honda Helix. A driver behind me thanked me for having it on there - he saw an attractive woman on the side and did not see me, but the strobe caught his eye. And probably saved my life. Worth the $80? No regrets!
  • I have seen uprights with rear lights on
    during the day. No trikes lit anytime
    here.
  • Read here: http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1012.html or here: https://practicalmotoring.com.au/car-news/do-bike-helmets-save-lives/ And for something truly enlightening, try reading about the Dutch here: https://www.treehugger.com/bikes/why-dutch-dont-wear-helmets.html

    Light it up, though. Get things lit up so YOU can see, and you'll be seen.
  • edited August 27
    Elrique64 wrote: »
    Read here: http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1012.html or here: https://practicalmotoring.com.au/car-news/do-bike-helmets-save-lives/ And for something truly enlightening, try reading about the Dutch here: https://www.treehugger.com/bikes/why-dutch-dont-wear-helmets.html

    Light it up, though. Get things lit up so YOU can see, and you'll be seen.


    Respectfully, I don't need an editorial or some arm chair theorist's POV on the subject. Have taken spills on the MTB and the helmet saved my head from slamming on asphalt, which could of caused worse issues, loss of hair, and road rash. All due to gravels kicked up by big pickup trucks.

    Rode motorcycles for many years and know that if one is not worn bad things would of happened. Once I wore a half-helmet, aka scooter helmet. Was doing 25 MPH and a camper truck pulled out too early, and when his aft end cleared had a station-wagon in from of me on collision. Helmet hit half an inch from the rim. Paramedic said if it was a little higher I'd be in ICU or dead. 3/4 minimum on a motorbike.

    Have taken spills on pedal-bikes and know that if I had not of worn a helmet I'd of been hurting more, but I only scraped a bit of plastic. Would rather dish out $60 on a new helmet than put out $500 in stitches and pain from all that.
    Bontrager will replace your helmet if you take a spill. LBS wanted to replace mine when the gravel toppled the Rockhopper, but I declined so could show that helmets do work.

    Will a bicycle helmet help one survive a head-on collision with a car? Probably not, but why take the chance? It's your head, you decide if some editorial speaks louder than common sense.

    No offense, but common sense is lacking a lot in today's world.
  • Some runners run faster than trike riders pedal and their head is going to fall a greater distance.
  • It never ceases to amaze me how we humans tend to get all worked up over our own opinions. I have found that. when attempting to show another person an alternative possibility, I get much further by not letting my own emotional investment in the topic get in the way of a creditable factual presentation of my perspective. And above all, I never am successful if I mix in name calling towards others.
  • It never ceases to amaze me how we humans tend to get all worked up over our own opinions. I have found that. when attempting to show another person an alternative possibility, I get much further by not letting my own emotional investment in the topic get in the way of a creditable factual presentation of my perspective. And above all, I never am successful if I mix in name calling towards others.

    Fully agree.

  • I found the third link I posted the most informational. Dutch bike riders are putting more miles on their bikes per capita than any other nation. And helmets just aren't used there.

    The main reason? Bikes have their own road system. They seldom share the road with cars. This is something the US can only strive to achieve.

    In states that have mandated helmet use for adult bike riders, there hasn't been a significant reduction in fatalities to justify the mandate. Yet more states are following this "bandwagon" due to misinformation. Bike events are including helmet rules. If you don't have one, you can't ride the event. BS, IMO.

    If you choose to wear one when you aren't forced to by the law, hey, more power to you. I choose not to wear one, even if mandated. I'll pay the fine and move on. That's my choice, just as it is yours to wear one. I would rather remain comfortable and enjoy the ride then boil my head in Styrofoam. Or I won't ride in the towns/counties in Washington state that require helmets in the first place.

    Mandating helmets is where I have issues. Requiring someone to wear one for a biking event only reduces the event's exposure and participation. And does nothing to add to the event's safety for ALL riders. And calling someone an idiot or say they are lacking common sense because they choose not to wear one when they aren't required to by law is insulting and degrading.

    Your anecdotal story of how a helmet protected your head doesn't convince me that it's safer for me to wear one. It does convince me that you had an issue riding your upright that led to the accident. It is a good thing you are on a trike now so you have a shorter distance to fall.

    I agree, common sense is sorely lacking. We have sidewalks, crosswalks and crossing signals for pedestrians. But we don't have parallel bike roads. You are either riding on the road with cars, or on the sidewalk with pedestrians. (Riding a bike on the sidewalk is against the law in most states, BTW.) What a mixed up country we have...

    Separate the types of traffic as we do for motor vehicles and pedestrians and helmets are moot.

    Until that happens though, I expect the laws are only going to get more and more stringent. More safety equipment is going to be required to ride, until we are forced to wear a bubble wrap suit just to ride a bike around town. I bet that helps raise the biking numbers... :(
  • How did the post started with lights got to helmet use?
  • edited August 27
    It never ceases to amaze me how we humans tend to get all worked up over our own opinions. I have found that. when attempting to show another person an alternative possibility, I get much further by not letting my own emotional investment in the topic get in the way of a creditable factual presentation of my perspective. And above all, I never am successful if I mix in name calling towards others.

    Don't ever get worked up over posts. :) It' more on how the person on the other end interprets expressions when reading is where emotions develop. Text carries no emotion on its own.


    Found that some people will go totally against any safety measure in order to prove some stupid point. Safety is there for a reason. It's not will it happen, it is more of when it does happen.
    However some people lack common sense and the chips are further stacked against them. It is ultimately their choice. When chips hit the fan will they blame others for the accident or accept the choice they made?


    Found an old 80's Bell MTB helmet a while back, with its B84 Snell Foundation sticker inside. I relied more on Snell approved helmets than any standard DOT version.
    People would ask me, why pay more for a sticker? Well, there's more to it than just a sticker, it's about real world testing, not arm chair theatrics. ;)

    36846592275_e07255ba8a_n.jpg


    In most states juveniles are required to wear a helmet, and also anyone riding after dark is also required to have lights and reflectors. Do they do it? Those that were raised to be safety conscious do. The others, wonder who they'll blame when the chips hit the fan.
  • edited August 27
    Elrique64 wrote: »
    In states that have mandated helmet use for adult bike riders, there hasn't been a significant reduction in fatalities to justify the mandate. Yet more states are following this "bandwagon" due to misinformation. Bike events are including helmet rules. If you don't have one, you can't ride the event. BS, IMO.
    :(

    Safety & Liability. Even with a signed waiver, there are people that will sue anyone over anything cause they won't accept things may have been their fault, or the families of the so-called victim.

    Safety, first and foremost, begins with individual. :)

    Elrique64 wrote: »
    Your anecdotal story of how a helmet protected your head doesn't convince me that it's safer for me to wear one. It does convince me that you had an issue riding your upright that led to the accident. It is a good thing you are on a trike now so you have a shorter distance to fall.

    More of a weight issue. More weight on top, less below. Add in gravel & uneven terrain (4 inch gaps in surfaces), traffic, and some impatient driver whom wants to rush out of font of you instead of waiting - stuff happens. It happened.
    Tore up the front derailleur. Hobbled back to the LBS for a quick fix, ordered a new front derailleur. LBS saw the slightly damaged helmet, more scratches than anything, and he offered to replace it for free right then.
    Elrique64 wrote: »
    I agree, common sense is sorely lacking. We have sidewalks, crosswalks and crossing signals for pedestrians. But we don't have parallel bike roads. You are either riding on the road with cars, or on the sidewalk with pedestrians. (Riding a bike on the sidewalk is against the law in most states, BTW.) What a mixed up country we have...

    Idaho & Oregon Law states that bicycles use bicycle lanes when provided. When there are no bicycle lanes it is suggested that they use sidewalks, unless they can keep up with traffic. Sorry, fella, I cannot ride 35 MPH on the flats.

    Pedestrians? Might see one or two in any given day. I yield to pedestrians, even ride out onto the grass or stop till they pass.
    I live & ride in a rural are, we don't have your city comforts or bicycle trails. Wished we did have. You should see the condition of the sidewalks. The county thinks it is more beneficial for them to grant bar licenses than it is to fix sidewalks.


    Trike on brother! :D
  • edited August 27
    FINN58 wrote: »
    How did the post started with lights got to helmet use?

    Was replies from @Elrique64 's editorial posts is where the derailment went to helmets. LOL

    I have to find a better reflective materials to use on the rims. Noticed the white is not reflecting as much as it should be, and the red isn't doing a thing... :(

    Would suggest whatever light system you do choose, take your trike out in a dark area and video record the lights/reflectors as you're walking around - varied distance. Then take still photos with camera/flash from various angles. Then you'll have a better idea what is working and where the weak spots are.

    Had people come up asking about the irregular flashing strobes, and where to purchase them. That is when you know you're being seen, or having drive-by comments from vehicles at night. :)


  • Found an old 80's Bell MTB helmet a while back, with its B84 Snell Foundation sticker inside. I relied more on Snell approved helmets than any standard DOT version.
    People would ask me, why pay more for a sticker? Well, there's more to it than just a sticker, it's about real world testing, not arm chair theatrics. ;)

    36846592275_e07255ba8a_n.jpg


    So, you're wearing a Snell Foundation bike helmet ?
  • Thinking about rear flashing strobes for the wife and I, rechargeable, for starters.
  • it is awful hard for an old mind to listen to the safety concerns of those who deliberately pit their 400 pounds of trike and cargo against 4,000 pound cars.

    methinks going out and playing with cars negates the expression of any safety advocacy.
  • Anyone use USB rechargeables? Wonder if they have a quick release like our computers, so they can be brought inside to recharge?
  • Finn, all rechargeables would have some sort of quick release so they can be charged.

    Most lights are designed to be attached to bicycle handlebars or seat posts. Finding adequate mounting adapters or making one yourself to fit a trike takes some imagination. So when you find something that perks your interest, find out how it mounts and if there are options.
    Also read up on reviews, and watch videos & video reviews.
  • JamesR wrote: »
    it is awful hard for an old mind to listen to the safety concerns of those who deliberately pit their 400 pounds of trike and cargo against 4,000 pound cars.

    methinks going out and playing with cars negates the expression of any safety advocacy.

    Agrees with honorable JR :)
  • the cygolote usb headlights use a screw clamp for securement, same the flare r blinky. the flare3 has a rubber strap as does the arella blinky.

    usb lights too expensive for me to leave them mounted for daylight poachers. nighttime parking at establishments good to be able to take off and secure.

    both rover and deltas have a 1-inch dowel or pvc pipe lashed across the seatback long enough so the blinkys mark the width of the trike. put headlights on the dowel for the rover. have a stem with a handlebar on the deltas, excellent headlight positioning.

    considering the nighttime no-lights-needed 2-wheeler attitude around here on the sidewalks, pedestrians might avoid serious injury if they were to wear a blinky. at night its the bicycles i worrk about, not the cars at intersections - they give me a lot more clearance than in daylight.
  • Actually the first post about helmets in this thread was here: http://www.terratrike.com/ttforum/discussion/comment/23431/#Comment_23431 and my first reply to it was in no means editorial. In fact, I lay that right on the post I just linked.

    Be seen, be aware, be safe. Lights flags, reflectors are part of being seen. Lights are part of being aware, as well. If you can't see the hazards, you are one of them. Be consistent so the others following you, meeting you or beside you are sure what you intend to do.
  • I use 2- COB(usb) set on strobe for rear, headlight on strobe on front, and a led whip. I have found that riding at dusk or dark, I am actually much easier to see. Those lights are bright.
  • TT has a set on the site. Only two led's
    per light. Is that enough to be seen? LBS has a set with more led's that run off aaa/aa batteries. Buy into the future?
  • Elrique64 wrote: »
    Actually the first post about helmets in this thread was here: http://www.terratrike.com/ttforum/discussion/comment/23431/#Comment_23431 and my first reply to it was in no means editorial. In fact, I lay that right on the post I just linked.

    Be seen, be aware, be safe. Lights flags, reflectors are part of being seen. Lights are part of being aware, as well. If you can't see the hazards, you are one of them. Be consistent so the others following you, meeting you or beside you are sure what you intend to do.

    That small paragraph covered head, hands, legs, feet, visibility.

    Read articles that most accidents occur in the daytime, only a few covered the time events such as - morning (sun glare), noon (rush traffic & glare), and that time just as the sun sets to an hour after it has set (dusk blind).

    Fluorescent clothing is only good on sunny days. Reflective trims reacts with artificial light. Having a vest or jacket that is both fluorescent & has reflective trim is advisable when on the streets. Get a mesh one.
    Wished there were mesh pants like this with highly reflective trim down the length-side of the legs too. Or patterned reflective material down the length of the legs.
  • Ordered some DOT-C2 Reflective Conspicuity Tape from eBay. Stuff seems to be super expensive, like $50 for a short roll. This seller had some in strips which were more affordable in that respect than buying a whole roll for a few needed inches.
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/whcanilang/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from=

    Since this stuff is 2 inches wide, can cut it in half and run the white on the front wheels, red or orange on the back, and probably will use orange on the Low Rider Rack sides.

    * V92 Orange is 250% More Reflective than V92 Red
    * V92 Orange is 50% More Reflective than V82 Red
    * Reflexite/Orafol/Oralite V82 is 50% More Reflective than V92

    Will take them out at night and takes some photos to see which is better. If orange is brighter will probably use that on the rear wheel in between the spokes.

    Is good to see others use it too. :)
    xit77t1sjfre.jpg

    While not a light per topic, is light related. ;)
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