Longest ride to date!

Prior to today's ride, my longest to date was just a tad under 32 miles. Today's ride eclipsed that by a pretty healthy margin. 42.4 miles. Beautiful sunny day, but a little warm at 85+. 7 hours of riding to get that distance, but that included over 3 hours of "stopped time" so total riding time was 3:45 and some change.

Used one battery pack for the trip out, and when it started showing it was at about 35% swapped to the other pack. Had 23+ miles on the first pack. Might be able to do a half century with the two packs.... :)

What a nice way to spend a day off from work! :)

Comments

  • Congrats Elrique64 on an epic ride. You will remember it and no doubt remember the lessons you learned in the process. Boy howdy, do I remember mine. I don't think I will ever forget it!

    It started out to be just a mildly ambitious and enjoyable ride, but Mother Nature was going to throw me some curves. I left home headed north with a goal of reaching the far north end of the Razorback Greenway.

    I made it the full distance but along the way I had to face a series of trials and tribulations. It began with having to shelter for a time in a man's garage (with permission of course) during a storm. Then the storm caught me out in the open in an industrial area with no place to hide where I got chilled and nearly soaked had I not brought a water resistant windbreaker (Thank you Walmart). This area was past a series of Walmart warehouses. (How's that for irony?)

    I finally made it into downtown Bentonville (Home of the Walmart) where I again had to shelter in a parking garage of a Walmart Neighborhood Market where I had some lunch. (Is there a pattern emerging here? :| ) The location was circumstantial as I was just passing through. ;) The weather was iffy and like a fool I continued on north. I was determined. (That's my story and I'm sticking to it!)

    The final run to the north was a long downhill MUP through a densely wooded area twisting and turning for several miles. Pedaling was unnecessary. It was beautiful with the scent of moist woods in the air. Finally I reached the terminus where there was a very nice Veteran's Memorial and a loop around a small lake. I had made it to my goal.

    Now all I had to do was pedal home, duh. Note to self: If you pedal out you have to pedal back. I mentioned that nice long downhill run, well now I had to pedal uphill all the way back to downtown Bentonville. The sun came out with a vengeance and as I climbed the hill I had a rather unsympathetic discussion with myself about this uphill/downhill concept. :p

    I made it back to downtown Bentonville and forged on toward home through a long stretch of open land where I ran into a stiff headwind that caused me to slow down and shift down a couple of gears (I was working off karma at an advanced rate!). The clock was ticking and the sun was heading toward the horizon. I stopped at a convenience store for a potty stop and some caffeine. Again I rode through a wooded area with a short killer climb and lots of twists and turns.

    The sun went down and now I was riding in the dark with headlights on and whistling a variety of my favorite 60s rock tunes. (Kind of like whistling while walking through a graveyard :o ) This particular stretch north of Springdale was isolated with the only light being from my headlights and the stars... s-p-o-o-k-y and not a soul around.

    Finally I got back into downtown Springdale where I headed west toward home. My legs were blasted and my feet were screaming at me. I recall repositioning my feet on the pedals seeking any little bit of respite from the pain. At a mile from home I seemed to gain new strength. (Horse smells the barn concept)

    When I pulled into the driveway in front of the garage I was exhausted and could barely get up off of the trike. My Rambler GT had gotten me to my goal and back. That night I slept like, well I think I was totally unconscious to tell the truth. I was away from home well over eight hours and covered some 55 miles. I never pulled anything like that again. ;) Note to self: Plan, plan, plan for contingencies.

    There have got to be some other long and/or adventurous rides out there. Let's hear some of them you fellow Trikesters. B)
  • Three to four hours on a trike. No thank you!
  • Before last week, my best was 18 miles. On Thursday, tooling around our vacation area, I did 19.6. For my wife that's just a warmup, as she usually does 50.

    The next day she convinced me to ride from Traverse City to Sutton's Bay and back. 39.6 miles by google, 34 by Strava, and 32.8 by Cateye. In lots of pain the last 5 miles.

    The next day she gets me out for another 20+ ride around town.

    I think she just wants my life insurance when the heart attack comes. Take a 340 pound 53 year old man out and cycle him to death.
  • depends on the relationship - she might be trying to prolong your life
  • I have accused my wife of the same thing until I got my RAT, now she blows me away with speed but I take her in distance!
  • Jrobiso2 wrote: »
    Before last week, my best was 18 miles. On Thursday, tooling around our vacation area, I did 19.6. For my wife that's just a warmup, as she usually does 50.

    The next day she convinced me to ride from Traverse City to Sutton's Bay and back. 39.6 miles by google, 34 by Strava, and 32.8 by Cateye. In lots of pain the last 5 miles.

    The next day she gets me out for another 20+ ride around town.

    I think she just wants my life insurance when the heart attack comes. Take a 340 pound 53 year old man out and cycle him to death.

    I have a similar relationship. Mine wants me to do a 75 mile round trip to Northport !
  • edited August 29
    "I think she just wants my life insurance when the heart attack comes. Take a 340 pound 53 year old man out and cycle him to death."

    I think she's working on getting you down to 240!
  • Elrique how much of your 42 mile trip did you pedal; how much you didn't? just curious. Thank you!
  • Elrique how much of your 42 mile trip did you pedal; how much you didn't? just curious. Thank you!

    No electrics for me. I pedal every foot of every mile. Wouldn't have it any other way.
  • edited August 30
    I pedaled the whole thing! (Ok, maybe 99%. Only 2 real busy intersections along the whole ride I used the throttle for.) The motor is set up for assist, throttle or nothing and the only times I use the throttle is crossing busy streets. (Light changes, now it's time to get across before the cars behind me start doing the one finger salute.) The rest of the ride was done with assist mode 3 (of 9) in 5th, 6th or 7th gear depending on incline and wind.

    Legs still feeling a little on the rubber side of it today, but I'm glad I did it. Gives me a mark to top now. And I also understand the range of the battery packs a lot better. I know the ranges I can expect from the first pack, which gives me a ball park for the second one. (First is an 11AH, second is a 13.6AH.)

    PS. Ain't nothing to brag about if I just throttled the whole ride. In fact, ain't nothing special about that at all. There are a lot more systems out there that can give 25mph+ and deliver 100 miles or more. Of course those are some BIG battery packs. In excess of 100AH for some I've heard of.
    Captainbob wrote: »
    Elrique how much of your 42 mile trip did you pedal; how much you didn't? just curious. Thank you!

    No electrics for me. I pedal every foot of every mile. Wouldn't have it any other way.

    As do I, with some very rare exceptions. (Already noted above.)

    I really can't get over the negativity of the quote above. As if I were some how cheating, or working less than someone else just because I am running e-assist.

    I can consistently ride further with it than what I can ride without. Not only that, but the speeds I hit are 2-3 times what I'm able to pedal. This gives me more options of where I can ride and makes riding just that much more enjoyable.

    Too many people on these forums buy a trike, show up for a week or a month, then just disappear, except to announce they are selling their trike. That tells me that they weren't enjoying it. And it became work for them to even think about continuing to ride. I've been here for over 3 years now (even though all of my old posts are now long gone.) and still sticking with it.

    So, kindly leave the purist attitude outside the thread, if not the boards entirely. We're all here to learn and purist attitudes aren't about learning, but about elitism and snobbery. We get enough of that from the DF world, no sense doing it to ourselves.

    /soapbox
  • There are times I wished had e-assist. Hadn't rode in a week cause of both jobs and needing sleep too. Last night was wore out for some unknown reason. Had a slight tailwind which helped till it turned into a breeze - where I stopped and enjoyed Rover being the only light source in the area.
    Was blissful until the bugs came in to crash the party.

    So those that claim they pedal only, how much do they pedal compared to a cross or tailwind? Surely natural help is no different than artificial wind (e-assist), save gettng the assistance when needed. :)

    Would go out tonight if had e-assist cause only got 4 hours sleep. Had a neighbor casing my trailer and making remarks how easy it would be to steal my Rover.
    So was visiting the local PD to file a report this morning. May have to come up with another idea of locking the 1 inch plywood door, or adding a security system with audible alarm. Sort of wished had a skunk-chain to lock Rover up with, with dye markers.

    It's a cool 89° and would be great to go for a ride. More power to ya if you have e-assist! The rest of us are jealous that you have it and we don't.
  • somehow i doubt the folks who cant afford a powered wheelchair sneer at those who can. my hope is the scorners of electric assist who discover the future joy of bone-on-bone knee joints wont whine too loudly.

    criticizing others for their mode of enjoyment, type of foot retention if any, number of flags, helmet use, the brand of toilet paper used is . . .
  • Suggesting is not criticizing. Sharing knowledge is help further the process of mankind. Wisdom however cannot be openly shared with all, as only those that are chosen can fathom its power. ~ The rest do the plug 'n pray, err play thing.
  • JamesR wrote: »
    somehow i doubt the folks who cant afford a powered wheelchair sneer at those who can. my hope is the scorners of electric assist who discover the future joy of bone-on-bone knee joints wont whine too loudly.
    .

    I know that feeling and am so, so glad it's gone!
  • Northport @TCEd is that town I liked better than Sutton's Bay. Nice restaurant in town that serves those orange creamcicle tasting drinks. Energy for the ride back!

    As for electric assist - if I had it I'd use it! Hills can hurt my knees badly. Waiting for TT's refit package for Rover, as I don't really want to go through @Elrique64 learning curve
  • edited August 30
    39 miles two days in a row, two weeks ago, on the Iron Ore Heritage Trail, Marquette, MI to Ishpeming and back. The first 8 miles traveling west from Marquette is a constant 3% grade incline, with several up and down "dipsy doodles" mid-way and then several winding 7% grades approaching Negaunee. Total elevation gain for the entire round trip is 1845 feet. Challenging ride outgoing, but, a blast on the return. On the trip out I keep telling my wife that for every mile out bound we will have a great mile on the run back. I have a "love hate" relationship with the trail, but in reality, it is one of my favorite rides. Over the course of two trips to Marquette the past two summers have ridden it five times. We plan to return again next year.
  • I do not know how the "electric' part of an e-trike works. I did the math for your ride time and distance, Elrique, 42.4 miles in 3.75 hours is 11.3 miles per hour, that (to me only) is a very fast clip!! On the flats and no tail wind I couldn't keep that speed up, To ME only (I am slow), 11 mph is quick, you must be in great shape and have triked for a long time! IF you really pedaled that whole distance un-assisted, as you said; but you then said ur batteries were drained some? Sorry I guess I don't understand how that works? NOT criticizing just want to understand how it works, please?
  • rover presents a problem using an external derailleur hanger. looks like falco follows the over-size axle with opposing flats to fit dropouts. the terratrike hanger cannot be drilled out to accommodate the wheel axle - the origin8 can, but then you get down to chain clearance issues. also gets a little messy installing 2 of the grintech torque arms.

    then there is the question of driveline clearance. with freewheels, 6 gears is a goodly number, dunno about the 8-gear freehubs. current low-rider rack is not usable with the x8 driveline. you can carry batteries in panniers if you want the weight low.

    if you plan on full-time electric assist you could drop the derailleur and rig the trike as a single-speed: "Riding in the middle gear may provide most optimum mix of motor and human power". you can view the wonder of it all at: www.electricbicycleworld.com › Info
  • edited August 30
    Delete
  • I do not know how the "electric' part of an e-trike works. I did the math for your ride time and distance, Elrique, 42.4 miles in 3.75 hours is 11.3 miles per hour, that (to me only) is a very fast clip!! On the flats and no tail wind I couldn't keep that speed up, To ME only (I am slow), 11 mph is quick, you must be in great shape and have triked for a long time! IF you really pedaled that whole distance un-assisted, as you said; but you then said ur batteries were drained some? Sorry I guess I don't understand how that works? NOT criticizing just want to understand how it works, please?

    E assist lessens the effort to pedal is what I understand but you still have to pedal or the motor will not engage and assist. He admits the assist allows him to move 2 to 3 times faster then without assist. So his pedal speed is around 3 to 4 mph without E assist.
    Does he burn less calories ? Who cares, he's riding and covering distance and enjoying the scenery. The only place I oppose E assist would be in any form of competition against conventional pedaling.

    Those that oppose E assist may change their mind once they experience a couple life altering health issues. The "it won't happen to me" logic is a myth.
  • so true on the myth.

    average? triker may apply 200 watts human energy to the pedals to move the steed. depending, e-assist can add 250, 500, or 700 watts to that effort (various legal limits). if you maintained 250 watts of effort and added 250 watts of assist you could go twice as fast and twice as far compared to non-assist.
  • If you read the reply I posted above, you would see that I said I had the motor set for assist level 3. Which, on this motor system, means roughly 1/3 of the total motor's power, or 750W/3=250W power from the motor.

    Your math is spot on as far as speed. My average speed was indeed 11.3mph through the entire ride. The highest speed I hit (strictly due to gravity I might add) was over 28mph. No matter how well you have your trike set up, a Rover at that speed can get real squirrely real fast. And not a lot of room to get things under control.

    Does this mean I wasn't pedaling? Oh hell no. I pedaled every mile, except as already noted above. To do other wise means I have an underpowered moped, and not an electric assisted trike.

    E-Assist doesn't "lessen" the pedaling required. it augments the power you are already putting out with your own legs. Some motors have something called a torque sensor. The sensor actually reads how hard you are "standing" on the pedals and increases or decreases the power accordingly. My motor system doesn't have sensor, but what it has instead is a set of sensors that read that the pedal shaft on the motor is turning.

    Then, based on the display's assist value (From 0 to 9 on the Bafang motor), it puts the appropriate amount of power to the chain. It takes a bit of fiddling around to figure out what gear, assist mode and power from the pedals equals what speed the trike is able to go. It takes a little bit of practice, but not a lot. The learning curve is kind of fun, actually.

    Do I burn less calories with the motor than I would without it? Yeah, on a per mile basis, I'm sure I do burn less. But since I'm doing a ton more miles, it's more than a wash. I'm burning more calories per ride than I would without the motor.

    Keep in mind, I'm riding with bad feet and a bad hip due to medical conditions from my service in the US Navy. If I could sustain even 4-6mph without the motor, for any length of time, I wouldn't have made the choice of adding the motor to begin with. As I can't, for me it was a no-brainer decision. And one of the best I've made in my life, IMO. 65# lost by riding isn't anything to sneeze at. And I attribute it to the trike AND the motor. (I would have given up riding without the motor, so there it is...)
  • Elrique64, my ability to walk/hike is limited by foot pain caused by my diabetic feet. Long gone are the days of hiking through the woods/cacti with a backpack. :/ . Gone are the days of riding my bicycle due to bone spurs in my shoulder. :/ My body has gone out of warranty.

    I found that I could ride a trike under my own power and I choose to use only my legs as long as I possibly can. I love riding and it's my exercise. When the time comes I'll switch to "E-Assist" and I don't fault anyone who chooses to go that route. The important thing is to keep riding, to get out in the open air, to see the world. It's about mobility and you've expressed that many times.

    My typical cruising speed is 5-6 mph on the flat or on a gentle upgrade. On a long flat stretch with momentum, 7-8 is comfortable... I'm never in a hurry (No bears here and rattlesnakes don't chase!). On a downgrade 10-12 is comfortable but it causes tunnel vision (half joking). Occasionally I'll hit 15-18 coming off an arched bridge or through an underpass. On one long stretch during El Tour de Tucson I hit 30-33 mph, passing bicycles (that raised so eyebrows!) and it was a good thing I was wearing fire retardant clothing (I'm joking about the clothing but not about the speed). I was more concerned with reaching the finish line before cut off time for the 37 mile leg of El Tour (I made it with a half hour to spare). On sharp upgrades (bridge approaches or from underpasses) I'll drop down into granny gear and be doing 2-3 mph (more to save/preserve the legs and to avoid inhaling small flying insects while gasping for air).

    I think I tend to ride more slowly because I weigh 240 lbs, I'm about to turn 69, I'm T2 diabetic and my joints creak. The Dumont weighs 38 lbs. Add brackets, lights, trunk, masts, repair gear (extra tubes 20 & 26, tools, patch kits, CO2 inflator with carts, chain break, extra links, cable ties, etc), first aid gear (ace bandage, band-aids, aspirin, glucose, road rash antiseptic...more to help others than myself), my cell phone, power pack, food bars, a 24 oz water bottle on the boom, a 40 oz stainless steel bottle, sunblock, a locking cable and I'm sure a missed a few things. I am prepared for contingencies and glad to help others if need be. So I'm easily pedaling an added 25 lbs.... so factor in physical resistance of propelling the trike itself and...

    E-Assist is great if you need it. Go for it. Pedal as much as you can because it's good for you physically and emotionally. It's independence. Pedal on brothers and sisters!
  • While the rest of Florida is mired in nasty weather, it is absolutely beautiful in the panhandle. Thursday I was able to get 10 miles in and it was only 78 degrees when I got home at 11 am. Today, the weather man said there would be extreme sunshine outside so I called my daughter-in-law and got her to ride with me. I did another 10 miles. That's 20 in 3 days. The legs are getting stronger every day!
  • I've been trying to do two or three rides every day this summer. On alternate days, weather cooperating, I ride 5-10 miles with my wife on her Traveler, and I ride my Rover. These are always w/o electric assist and we average 6-8 mph. On the days I ride with my wife, I usually ride a second time alone, but at similar speeds w/o assist. On the alternate days I try to ride 2-3 times for 10-20 miles on each ride. On these rides I typically average 8-12 mph. My rides are relatively flat and last 2 hours or less typically.

    My longest continuous ride was 33 miles in a bit more than three hours. My longest day riding was 47 miles, 1 ride of 16.1 miles, 1 of 15.76 miles, and the last one was 14.8 miles- all with electric assist.

    Had a goal to ride 1000 miles this summer, and I have proudly attained my goal!
  • Everyone can feel accomplished. I did my longest ride today. 12 miles!!! Got my Rover Aug.23. Have ridden it every day since trying to go a little farther each time. Totally pumped about 12 miles!
  • Congrats! That's also the longest I've ridden in 3 years. I just don't have a desire to go any further or ride longer.
  • If I had to repeat, over and over in my mind, exercise, exercise, exercise, I'd never get anything done! Now, pedal, pedal, pedal, have fun, have fun, have fun, that I can do. :D
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