Clipless Pedals

Clip in —- Yes or no
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Comments

  • It's an individual decision. For me, YES!! But I used them for about 27 years........used the old "Toe clips and toe straps" for about 7 years before clipless. Some folks don't care for them some do. MY opinion for me only, is the heal straps TT provides are necessary to ride with; to prevent "heel suck". Just saying. Otherwise "heal suck" is a very good possibility and VERY hurtful/painful!
  • I have toe clips AND TT heel slings. Kinda pain, getting better at getting in to them. Bought toe clips at LBS that dont use a strap up front. The plastic toe clip is flexible that makes it easier to get your shoe into them.
  • Some method of securing your foot to the pedal is important to help prevent leg or foot injury that can happen if your foot slips off the pedal and hits the ground while moving. In that scenario the cross bar will hit and damage your calf, lower leg, ankle or foot.
  • edited June 19
    My feet after awhile go to sleep. Feet are below my heart. Laces too tight? 41
    year vet of the type 1 diabetic war? I don’t know. Have to try my Crocs and see. Still wear socks to keep sling’s Velcro from rubbing on skin. TC- you were going to video climbing in and out of your sled..Is it on YouTube?? :)
  • Had started with standard pedals with the nylon/velcro heel straps. Problem with them you never knew if those lightweight straps were engaged properly or when they were not.
    This came to light when I was riding over various surfaces, dips, bumps, and whatnot. My feet would fly forward/upward off the heel straps - and they do not automatically engage when the feet came back into contact with the pedals. Had more than a few close calls. Higher speeds or downhills this scenario would be disastrous.

    And I ride anywhere I can, even of hard pack, dirt, grass, urban ground, suburban surfaces. I prefer to know am strapped in. Those heel straps are a reasonable alternative; yet, are not accident proof.

    Back in the days of MTBing had toe clips. Had a few occasions where they got ripped out when trying to avoid collisions or deer. Rather not ever use them. Personal experience. To each their own.


    Originally got egg beaters after listening to an older LBS manager talking to some Air Force personnel that just got their MTBs. Decided then that the advantages, least for my use, would of been of far more benefit & I would not have to worry about falling over while clipped in at stops. /very big grin

    Egg beaters perty much concentrate the point of pressure to one specific area of the shoe, which can get sore after riding a while. Pulling one's foot our of the clip to pedal midfoot on egg beaters did not work well.

    Swapped over to dual platform clipless pedals and these are absolutely amazing! Is like not being clipped in; the pedal supporting fore & aft is like riding a standard pedal, however your feet are clipped in. Way more comfortable than egg beaters. Worlds of difference!


    Last bit of advice:
    Position the cleat where the ball of the foot is forward of the axle.
    Lace your shoes up snug - not tight. One's feet may change during the ride, and the foot needs to be comfortable. Tight shoes cause cramping, pressure, fatigue, and will make the feet go numb.
    And one can pull back on the pedals while the other leg is pressing down - useful for hills and a great workout.

    ¬ ITL
  • What’s an egg beater pedal? Only thing that has stopped me from trying is the plate sticking out of bottom of shoe.
  • Finn59 wrote: »
    My feet after awhile go to sleep. Feet are below my heart. Laces too tight? 41
    year vet of the type 1 diabetic war? I don’t know. Have to try my Crocs and see. Still wear socks to keep sling’s Velcro from rubbing on skin. TC- you were going to video climbing in and out of your sled..Is it on YouTube?? :)

    I've been riding longer distances lately and have felt my toes going to sleep. I stop and eat a granola bar and feel much better. The toes go to sleep long before I get light headed due to low blood sugar.
  • I carry two bananas with me now in the cooler. For low sugars and leg cramps. The other day at the 7 mile mark I had a reading of 64. Didn’t feel it coming on.
  • Thanks for y’alls input. Used SPDs on mountain & road bikes but new to the trike. I’m thinking SPD on that too
  • If you do go SPD, would suggest platform clipless over a pegged or egg beater.

    llnj2gjtt0o4.jpg

    ¬ ITL
  • Show an image of the bottom of your biking shoe.
  • Sorry, I don't ride a bike.

    ¬ ITL
  • Picture of the footwear you use with these pedals then. Picture of the sole of your footwear that has the hardware/plate that engages with this pedal please.
  • Oh, you want to see what I stepped in. I see...
    zegv77k6vha6.jpg
    The cleat has 3 settings on this particular shoe. Have mine set to the middle.
    Also, not all clipless pedals have adjustable tension springs. Would suggest a clipless pedal with multiple spring tension settings.

    Would of rather preferred an over the ankle shoe/boot - cannot find one. Was wearing 13 wide at the time; these shoes were import sizing so had to go one size larger to a EU 48/US 13.75/UK 12.75/CM 30.9

    VA Doctor says our shoes change as we get older. Also try the cycling shoes on before purchasing. Wear thin socks. Not heavy, thick, woolen things.

    ¬ ITL
  • Shimano A-530 pedals are good. One side clip, the other not, and the clip side has full support all around. The M-530 is the same, but both sides are clipped with surrounding support. Both models have fully adjustable clip tension.

    https://amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1529502304&sr=8-1&keywords=Shimano+A-530
  • Is the hdwe for your shoes included with the purchase of a set of pedals??
  • They should. Both sets I had gotten had cleats & screws in the packages.

    ¬ ITL
  • I think mine did. If not, they are available at any LBS that sells MTB bikes, and are pretty cheap as they will need replaced every year or so, depending on how much you walk in the shoes.
  • Was at the closest trike shop this am and saw pedals but didn’t see any clip ins. Not in the market for them at the moment. LBS should have them since they deal in high end df’s. Carbon and the like.
  • DF's are often more likely to go with Road style clip-in's, (larger 3 pointed plastic things that are outside the tread) rather than MTB's (Mountain Bike) style, which are inset into the shoe (2 screws, smaller) to allow walking when required.
  • edited June 25
    Jrobiso2 wrote: »
    DF's are often more likely to go with Road style clip-in's, (larger 3 pointed plastic things that are outside the tread) rather than MTB's (Mountain Bike) style, which are inset into the shoe (2 screws, smaller) to allow walking when required.

    My wife has the road type clip in for her road bike and they wear out quickly since they strike the ground when walking, also makes you walk sorta funny. She has MTB shoes/clips for the MTB. We have way to many bikes in our garage, Trek wins by numbers and dollars spent.
  • Personally I think MTB style wins hands down for trikers. I personally like to get off and walk into the coffee shop without looking like a newborn giraffe trying to walk for the first time.
  • edited June 27
    Moved the cleats back some on the left foot. and that felt really good.
    Then the right foot got jealous. At dinner grabbed the Y wrench and moved the right shoe cleats back. My God, what a difference!! :D No foot/pedal issues after, and the knees were happier.

    So where the shoes would normally put the metatarsal over the axle, I put that portion of the foot more forward. All I can say is, WOW.

    When I moved the left shoe cleats back I was compensating for having a long leg. But in doing so I was listening to my body, and the brain was saying the right foot would like this position too.

    Last year, with the egg beaters, the first holes on the shoe for laces was over the axle. With these newer platform clipless now the second hole for shoe laces is now over the axle. That small bit of different made a serious change for more comfort and better pedaling.

    ¬ ITL
  • I'm in the process of upgrading my standard Rover x8 with a Schlumpf High Speed Drive, and 24" wheels. I'm thinking about changing pedals from my current setup; original pedal, heel strap with added toe clips.It's been good so far.
    The Schlumpf needs some lateral foot movement in order to shift,but the arrangement I have limits any side to side motion to none. How much yaw can I get before coming unclipped?
  • Seems a far bit and even then mine don't come completely out of clip if I straighten back to centre. Dont know if this enough to shift the Schlumpf
  • I use Power Grips rather than clipless pedals and shoe cleats, but this arrangement allows me to shift the Schlumpf with either heel. It doesn't shift fast, nor what I would call easy, but it works fine as long as you are not trying to shift back and forth between the two virtual chainrings for each successive gear. I typically use the smaller chainring for most of my riding, and shift to the higher one only for long downhills, or really long gradual declines. I would encourage you to try one on a trike SteveR before you buy one. If the Paterson shifts with a hand shifter, that might make for easier and faster shifts if you envision shifting extensively back and forth. If you are near mid-Michigan, I would be happy to let you try mine. Also, I have read about a new electronic shifting Schlumpf drive. It is probably much more expensive being the new kid on the block so to speak. .
  • TrikeBirder, how often do you shift the Schlumpf during a typical ride? At Riderfest, I shifted to the lower gear about 3 times in the 10 miles. There were some large hills on that route and I was not used to them. I like the hand-shifting ability. Using the heel might be an issue for me.
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