Direct steering vs Linkage steering

edited October 2011 in Rambler
I heard that the new Rambler will have a Linkage steering and wonder if it is better than the Direct steering.

I own a Rover-8 with Direct steering and found that I have an oversteering problem at speed more than 20 mph. Will Linkage steering correct this problem? If so, I am interested in trading in my Rover for the Rambler. Any comments. Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • The specifications page says direct steering.
    Fran
    Fran
    Rosie "Rambling Rose"
    TT Rambler
  • Rambler is direct steering which is the same as the Rover.
    Kelli B
    Sales, TerraTrike
  • homer168 wrote:
    I heard that the new Rambler will have a Linkage steering and wonder if it is better than the Direct steering.

    I own a Rover-8 with Direct steering and found that I have an oversteering problem at speed more than 20 mph. Will Linkage steering correct this problem? If so, I am interested in trading in my Rover for the Rambler. Any comments. Thanks in advance.

    Relaxing your grip on the steering will stop the over steering problem. I am assuming that you double checked the steering alignment and it is OK. About 1/16" of toe in will also help when going fast. All trikes need a very light and relaxed touch on the steering when going fast. This requires riding one for awhile and getting used to trike steering.
  • I've found that on a smooth, straight road, I don't even grip. My hands relax on the handles and that's enough. Going downhill is likewise a very light touch. The only time I have to really *steer* is when I navigating through obstacles (Road Detour signs, glass or other puncturing stuff on the road, roadkill, mystery substances, etc.), or do any kind of turn. The Rover steering is a dream for me!
    I Have My Rambler, SUNNIE!
    My Noob Blog - frontfendersngum.com

    IGP1323-Th.jpg
  • Yuppers, when I am going downhill and coasting, I only put a couple of fingers of each hand on the steering arms. Unless you haven't checked the toe-in, it is simply a case of using too much muscle with turning or veering.

    If you haven't done so, you may wish to check out the video that teaches you how to check and set the amount of toe-in/out.
    ---
    Peter_C
    TerraTrike Rover W/N360 by NuVinci
    http://s1103.photobucket.com/albums/g475/Peter_CC/Peter_C Trike Album/
    
    (copy and paste into your browser) to see ---> My Trike Photos
    ---
  • I am _so_ glad this topic was addressed here. I am getting close to buying a recumbant trike, hoping LBS will get a Rambler in for me to try out. I only rode a Rover around in the shop, and was worried over the possibility of severe dangerous oversteering at 15+mph. Glad to see it's a matter of experience and a light touch.

    Paul H
  • prhkgh wrote:
    I am _so_ glad this topic was addressed here. I am getting close to buying a recumbant trike, hoping LBS will get a Rambler in for me to try out. I only rode a Rover around in the shop, and was worried over the possibility of severe dangerous oversteering at 15+mph. Glad to see it's a matter of experience and a light touch.

    Paul H

    Any trike when you first try it will feel "twitchy". Much of this is due to the inexperience of the rider, steering trikes, and sometimes due to a slight mis-adjustment of the toe-in. A slight toe in will make the steering much more docile at speed, but it is important to get some hours riding a trike, before you start trying to get some real speed going. A light touch, not a death grip, on the steering arms is the way to go. I hit 28 mph down a hill with my Rover today, and it steered beautifully.
  • I wrote *somewhere* that steering the Rover and Rambler is a dream on downhills. I know it's due to the direct steer - they ride like they're on rails. And what CaptBob said was right - I found the Rambler a little twitchy at first until I got accustomed to it. It's the same steering, but a different trike. Now it's no effort at all. Just a light touch and enjoy the ride!
    I Have My Rambler, SUNNIE!
    My Noob Blog - frontfendersngum.com

    IGP1323-Th.jpg
  • I JUST RECEIVED MY ROVER ; TRICKED OUT WITH MARATHON 100PSI TIRES WITH NUVINCI REAR AND PATERSON CRANK ; EXTRA LARGE SEAT;EXTENDER STEERING CONTROLS; COMPUTER ; TWO FLAGS;  ANY SUGGESTIONS ON HOW TO SET THE TOE-IN; SO I WILL NOT BURNUP MY TIRES ? 
    ANY THOUGHTS ON HOW TO PERFECT MY SPIN ?
    THANKS FOR ANY HELP.
  • I purchased a used Rover 8, and used it for about a month; then it got stolen by my wife, so I bought a Rambler.  My son has spinal cord injuries and lasting balance issues, so we gave her Rover 8 to him.  He loves it.  Now I have to buy her a new trike.  However, I'm thinking I may need to give her my Rambler and go with another brand.  I have a really old rotator cuff issue, and turning my wrist to hold onto the horizontal handlebars makes my shoulder ache after about 30-45 minutes.  I have been toughing it out so we can ride for at least two hours, but since we are now where we need to buy a new trike anyway, I think some other brand that has vertical handles may be the way to go.  Sure wish Terratrike had some mod for this problem.  Surely I'm not the only person out there with rotator shoulder issues who use that.  Any ideas?
    ps - I really like having the enclosed 8 speed hub, and that's just not available on very many other trikes.
  • I now have 60 miles on my new Rambler GT and I'm finding that just riding is a good learning experience!  I've had it up to 20 mph and I discovered that very little input to the steering is required to make to make a big change.  I loosened the steering tension a tiny bit and that has helped.  The big thing for me is learning to relax my upper body.  I find myself tensing up and I have to consciously relax.  More and more I'm finding myself placing my hands loosely over the grips.  I always wear riding gloves too.  Triking is a big change from my road bike and I wouldn't trade the trike for anything.
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