Idler Size questions

Hey folks,

Does anyone have specific dimensions for the Deluxe 10 Tooth Idler? 
Specifically,

1: What is it's diameter (including the flange)?

and

2: What size bolt (diameter) will I need for it?

I have a 2012 Rover 8 that I had to convert to an external setup last season, and now I'm trying to setup an idler for the return chain. I'll help keep it off the ground, as well as reduce instances of the chain jumping off the front chainring.

- PaulNM


 

Comments

  • Sorry for taking so long to reply, I've been really sick.

    Thanks for the dimensions, they give me the ballpark figures I need. I was referring to the deluxe 10 tooth idler, so it'll be slightly smaller than what you have (deluxe 13 tooth). 

    My plan is similar to what you suggest. Using the actual seat bolt as the ilder bolt would put it too high, though. I'll pick up something I can use as a hanger, like a metal strip with holes. I can hang it from the seat bolt so the idler bolt can be a few inches lower. I'm also flirting with using a second Idler "L" Mounting Bracket to do it.

    - PaulNM
  • That's good to know about the Terratrike "L" bracket. From the photo I thought it was made of thick metal, but it could easily be plastic instead. I've ordered a 10-tooth idler and 1 "L" bracket to keep the chain from jumping out.

    Once I have them I'll pick up a bolt and some nylon nuts for it, along with something I can fashoin as a hanger from the seat's quick release bolt.

    I've heard of people using skateboard wheels, but decided on a "proper" toothed cog and "L" bracket so I don't have to worry about it popping off.

    - PaulNM 
  •   So, did it work out?
  • Yes, very well. Will have to get around to posting pics some day.  I did have some concern that the hanger I built would prevent the quick release bolt from holding the seat clamp together tight enough. After a couple of rides it bent enough to fit in, and I've had no seat slip since then.

    - PaulNM
  • Here is the solution......

    Go to TerraCycle, they make all manner of recumbent idler kits for many manufacturers. 

    Including TerraTrike

    Search on Terra Cycle + Idlers  
    About the picture.....<div><br></div><div>I got here on my 12th Hand Assembled Frame of December 1967 Schwinn Paramount, because TeraTrikes were not then allowed in the week long charity cycling event in the Colorado Rockies..  <div><br></div><div>T<span style="font-size: 10pt;">hey are now, and this is where I'll be in June 2017</span></div></div>
  • Sadly not for square frame trikes like the Rover.  Even if they did, I'd still end up making my own. Their idlers and idler kits are incredibly expensive. Their cheapest non-toothed idler is twice the cost of TT's deluxe 13 tooth idler. (And almost three times the cost of TT's deluxe 10 tooth idler, which is what I picked up.)

    - PaulNM
  • Dear Paul, NM

    Yes they are expensive.

    But if you make your brackets, you may still want to consider their high end idlers.

    I ride my TerraTrike daily and to the extreme, so I found out that I actually wore the teeth off of the Delrin /  Plastic stock idlers.

    But not on the Terra Cycle products.


    About the picture.....<div><br></div><div>I got here on my 12th Hand Assembled Frame of December 1967 Schwinn Paramount, because TeraTrikes were not then allowed in the week long charity cycling event in the Colorado Rockies..  <div><br></div><div>T<span style="font-size: 10pt;">hey are now, and this is where I'll be in June 2017</span></div></div>
  • True, metal teeth and tougher plastics will definitely last longer. In my case I only have a few thousand miles on the trike so far, so I don't really need to pay for high end components.

    Also the idler I set up is a return idler, so it undergoes even less stress. It's really there to just lift the long chain up a bit higher off the ground and break up the length of slack chain. Without it there's a tendency for the slack chain to build up resonant swings bad enough to knock it off the crankring.

    - PaulNM
  • If you dig though the Terra Cycle Idler pages, including the FAQs, you will eventually figure out that the toothed idlers they sell are for the Power side and that they sell a special covered smooth idler surface for the return side.

    And I never thought that they would make a difference on an idler happy Sportster, but they actually do.  

    And in the DC metro area, I've ended up helping the TerraTrike owners with chain tube models, such as the Rovers and Ramblers change over to idlers and ditching the chain tubes.  

    And for those models, after your lengthen the chain, it all works smoother.

    And if you go all idler, then you can start "hacking" your drive train because you can change the relationship of the chain to the rear derailleur and the cassette.

    Then on a 10 speed Rambler, for roughly $150 in a collection of replacement derailleur + cluster + MTB "stump jumper"  parts, you can go to a 11-40 tooth cluster.

    That means your lowest low SIGNIFICANTLY improves to the point where by you can climb a 10-12% Blue Ridge Parkway grades from a dead stop at the bottom.
    About the picture.....<div><br></div><div>I got here on my 12th Hand Assembled Frame of December 1967 Schwinn Paramount, because TeraTrikes were not then allowed in the week long charity cycling event in the Colorado Rockies..  <div><br></div><div>T<span style="font-size: 10pt;">hey are now, and this is where I'll be in June 2017</span></div></div>
  • In my case I went from an SA hub to a 48/38/28 and 11-30 setup. It added a bit higher end and a fair amount of lower end.  I went with a toothed idler as it would help reduce the likelihood of the chain bouncing around in it and/or popping out while riding. It was only about $4 more than TT's standard (non-tooth) idler.

    If I were someone used to a different hub, I'd have gone with smaller front sprockets. The other internal hub setups tend to have a similar low end, but a much lower high end than the SA.

    - PaulNM
Sign In or Register to comment.