What I carry on my trike (Clue: lotsa stuff)

Florida_bound (FB) described the zipper pouch attached to the strut of her trike and all the things she carried. She commented on how handy it was and how much stuff it could hold. My thanks to her for the comments. It gave me the idea to start another discussion since it's an important consideration when riding a trike.

If you're riding where you can easily call for help/rescue then carrying a lot of stuff is not as necessary; however, some things like FB described are necessary such as ID, insurance cards, meds, sunglasses, and so on. Everyone's needs are different. Zipper pouches come in all different sizes and flavors. Let's explore the topic for the benefit of new riders.

There is a zipper pouch underneath the seat of my Catrike (It's a Catrike thing) where I keep a multitool and a baggy with business sized "meet and greet" cards I created in MS Publisher. When I meet and chat with other trikers I give them a card that has my name and email address. I'm not a Chatty Cathy but I do get into some interesting conversations on occasion. People are interesting and I like to hear about their adventures. I like to see what trikes they're riding and how they have outfitted them.

Since I go on longer rides, out on the trails among the cacti and venomous critters, I carry a lot of stuff in my trunk bag. Most important is repair stuff: 20" and 26" tubes for my Dumont, a patch kit, a CO2 inflator, spare CO2 carts, a chain tool, spare chain links, pliers, screwdriver, and vinyl gloves. If you're away from home/vehicle (for me maybe tens of miles) and you have a puncture or a broken chain you need to be able to do repairs. You can easily walk a bicycle, but not a trike. With my Type 2 Diabetes walking a long distance is very painful.

I also carry extra water, snack bars for myself (but I can share). As a former first responder I carry some basic first aid materials: glucose liquid, aspirin, ACE bandage, pressure bandage, band aids, antibiotic cream, adhesive tape, tweezers, scissors, small razor blade cutter, a cigarette lighter, and a foil type emergency blanket (keeps someone from going into shock), etc. You never know what you might run into on the trail. I want to help others (including those fast moving, obnoxious cyclists who may crash into a Cholla cactus) if I can. It's part of my nature.

I also carry a couple of spare battery packs for my cell phone, some stretchy velcro straps, a neck gaiter (can serve as an evaporative cooler and sun shield), extra riding gloves (full finger if it gets too cold), a rain poncho (tiny and disposable), a length of small nylon cord, and extra clothing as necessary to fit the weather.

Not looking at my trike and going by memory I may have overlooked some things, but it's a good start.

What are some things that come to your mind? Please add and share your comments.

Comments

  • I also have a container on my rear rack that holds a U lock and cable, an extra inner tube, spare lights if I'm ever caught out in the dark, and a tube repair kit. I recently used it and found out the patches were garbage. I went to the local Ace Hardware and bought one with the glue and patches. This pouch also expands so I can go to a grocery store then put the bags in the pouch.

    I am considering adding a charger for the cell phone and a first aid kit. I also have an instant link to 911 on my Apple watch. It will work well as long as the phone does not land more than 300 feet away from me!
  • Someone on the Forum mentioned using two TT seat bags on his and her trikes. The second seat bag goes on the front of the seat with the zippered bag under the front seat lip. I really like that idea and plan to add a second seat bag to both my Rover and my wife's Traveler. I'm thinking that a seat wedge may help one stay in place. Anyone have experience with using a seat bag in the seat front bottom that could speak to any difficulty in keeping a front seat bag firmly in place?
  • I've posted this before. Besides whatever clothing I need for the weather I carry ,
    cell phone
    water as needed
    Goo energy packs
    $50
    drivers license
    This is typical for rides out to 50 miles and on paved trails without the various thorns. In the past three years I've haven't needed the cell phone or money or drivers license. I do good tires, correct pressures and maintain the chain and drive system periodically.
    Also, I ride on a large trail system with a LOT of bikes, bike clubs, racing clubs and seldom see a breakdown other then a occasional flat. My wife rides her Trek appx. 1000 mile annually and has not had a breakdown in five years doing rides up to 75 mile.

    I am not attempting to influence anyone into following my path.


  • TCEd wrote: »
    I've posted this before. Besides whatever clothing I need for the weather I carry ,
    cell phone
    water as needed
    Goo energy packs
    $50
    drivers license
    This is typical for rides out to 50 miles and on paved trails without the various thorns. In the past three years I've haven't needed the cell phone or money or drivers license. I do good tires, correct pressures and maintain the chain and drive system periodically.
    Also, I ride on a large trail system with a LOT of bikes, bike clubs, racing clubs and seldom see a breakdown other then a occasional flat. My wife rides her Trek appx. 1000 mile annually and has not had a breakdown in five years doing rides up to 75 mile.

    I am not attempting to influence anyone into following my path.


    TCEd, neither am I. My post was informational. An experienced cyclist probably knows and understands the need to be prepared for contingencies. The switch from a bicycle to a trike is substantial. The thought of pushing a disabled trike should give one pause to think and that's what I was pointing out. Lock my trike to a tree, walk home, come back later and hope my trike is still there and in one piece. I don't even like that idea. That trike is my baby.

    Twice in one year I've assisted riders. One, fifteen miles from home, had a puncture. I gave him my spare tube. He installed the tube. He offered me cash which I refused. The second was a snapped chain on a man's wife's bike. He repaired it. I met them returning later all smiles and waving. I chose to help, and that's just me. When I see what doesn't look quite right I'll say, "Everything OK?" When I hear, "I'm fine, thanks for asking." It gives me a warm fuzzy feeling. Mechanical problems do happen along the trails and I'll offer to help. If it's refused I'll ride on. If it's a medical issue, and I haven't encountered one yet, I'll do what's appropriate. Such is life.

    The fact that you've never had a problem over an extended period of time does not mean something will not happen in the future. To be aware is to be prepared. You indicated that you are prepared and do preventive maintenance so as to lessen the chances of a problem. That's wise. You've done what myself and others have done. Thank you for endorsing the ideas that I put forth in beginning this thread.

    Thanks for adding to the conversation B)

  • edited September 2017
    I also have a container on my rear rack that holds a U lock and cable, an extra inner tube, spare lights if I'm ever caught out in the dark, and a tube repair kit. I recently used it and found out the patches were garbage. I went to the local Ace Hardware and bought one with the glue and patches. This pouch also expands so I can go to a grocery store then put the bags in the pouch.

    I am considering adding a charger for the cell phone and a first aid kit. I also have an instant link to 911 on my Apple watch. It will work well as long as the phone does not land more than 300 feet away from me!

    Thanks for the note on the "not good" patch kit. It's something to think about for sure. I'm going to examine my patch kit and see if it's really up to the task. Thanks for the valuable advice. It also makes me wonder about the shelf life of things that I carry. Hmmm....

    Those extra power cells are wonderful. I found one that has the charge equivalent of three phone batteries and it has a built in LED flashlight. I periodically put it on a charge to make sure it's ready.

    Also, my trunk bag is a Blackburn. It has side pockets which have an inner zipper that allows the inner part to hang down and become a pannier. I can use it for additional storage if I need it or roll it up if I don't.

    I found a couple of double S-ring clippy thingies (rated for up to 75 lbs) at Lowes that I use to attach additional things (small bag with windbreaker, locking cable, etc) to the carrying handle of my trunk bag.

    Thanks for sharing. When you start riding you begin to figure out what works and what else you can do.
  • TCEd wrote: »
    I've posted this before. Besides whatever clothing I need for the weather I carry ,
    cell phone
    water as needed
    Goo energy packs
    $50
    drivers license
    This is typical for rides out to 50 miles and on paved trails without the various thorns. In the past three years I've haven't needed the cell phone or money or drivers license. I do good tires, correct pressures and maintain the chain and drive system periodically.
    Also, I ride on a large trail system with a LOT of bikes, bike clubs, racing clubs and seldom see a breakdown other then a occasional flat. My wife rides her Trek appx. 1000 mile annually and has not had a breakdown in five years doing rides up to 75 mile.

    I am not attempting to influence anyone into following my path.


    TCEd, neither am I. My post was informational. An experienced cyclist probably knows and understands the need to be prepared for contingencies. The switch from a bicycle to a trike is substantial. The thought of pushing a disabled trike should give one pause to think and that's what I was pointing out. Lock my trike to a tree, walk home, come back later and hope my trike is still there and in one piece. I don't even like that idea. That trike is my baby.

    Twice in one year I've assisted riders. One, fifteen miles from home, had a puncture. I gave him my spare tube. He installed the tube. He offered me cash which I refused. The second was a snapped chain on a man's wife's bike. He repaired it. I met them returning later all smiles and waving. I chose to help, and that's just me. When I see what doesn't look quite right I'll say, "Everything OK?" When I hear, "I'm fine, thanks for asking." It gives me a warm fuzzy feeling. Mechanical problems do happen along the trails and I'll offer to help. If it's refused I'll ride on. If it's a medical issue, and I haven't encountered one yet, I'll do what's appropriate. Such is life.

    The fact that you've never had a problem over an extended period of time does not mean something will not happen in the future. To be aware is to be prepared. You indicated that you are prepared and do preventive maintenance so as to lessen the chances of a problem. That's wise. You've done what myself and others have done. Thank you for endorsing the ideas that I put forth in beginning this thread.

    Thanks for adding to the conversation B)


    I agree with you and everyone and what they carry.
  • My daughter-in-law rides with me occasionally but also rides by herself. She tried to follow a path we had taken and got lost. Fortunately, she was only a few miles from home. I asked if she had her cell phone with her and she said no. I would not even consider riding without a cell phone. Would you? How did we ever live without them?
  • Then again, @Florida_bound, what did we have when we were kids, riding out at all hours many miles from home? Certainly no cell phones back in that stone age!
    I would have had to chisel a message on a rock and bury it for some archaeologist to find years later!
  • Taking a cell phone with you on a rider is a smart decision. What does bother me is our dependency on them all the time. The other day I drove about 3 miles from our house and realized I forgot my cell phone. I actually began to turn around and get it but then realized how foolish that was and continued to my destination but still feeling sorta naked.
  • Now you can buy an new Apple Watch with cell service. You'll always have a phone with you! I have an original one and can talk or send texts through it but the phone has to be within 300 feet. I have answered a phone call while riding. Very convenient!

    I used to ride long distances when I was younger but always in urban areas. If I had a problem, there was always someone who would stop and help. That was a much different time!
  • edited September 2017
    I used to ride long distances when I was younger but always in urban areas. If I had a problem, there was always someone who would stop and help. That was a much different time!

    I used to ride long distances when I was a kid in Tucson and I think it was the "You be home by supper time!" that helped me find my way home. :)

    And how did we live without cell phones, PCs and Google? It surely was a different time.

  • Remember getting out of the chair to shut the tv off?
  • Or to change the channel for Dad. He didn't have 5 kids for nothing!
  • And only having 4 channels
  • I had 3. ABC, CBS, and NBC. And yes, kids were the remote (of which I was the only kid, so I did all the remote work).
  • We had PBS and what you would consider WB also. They broadcast shows like "Ma and Pa Kettle" and "Little Rascals". I grew up in a big city. We were ecstatic when cable was installed in 1982.
  • Or to change the channel for Dad. He didn't have 5 kids for nothing!

    I got to go outside to turn the antenna which was held in place by a pair of vise grips. Through the window I would hear, "A little more. Oops, too much..." Not fun when there was snow on the ground.
  • In Tucson?

    On an isolated farm in NW Arkansas seven miles from a town of 1,100. We had no telephone either. My only social contacts were going to high school or when we went into town for groceries on Saturday. It was me, dad and mom on the farm. I hated it and I think dad did it to get me out of the city (Tucson) at the outset of the sixties. I had no choice. TV and the library (read a bazillion books) were my window to the world. Those four years were not fun. College saved me. I never went back to a farm. ;)
  • In Tucson?

    On an isolated farm in NW Arkansas seven miles from a town of 1,100. We had no telephone either. My only social contacts were going to high school or when we went into town for groceries on Saturday. It was me, dad and mom on the farm. I hated it and I think dad did it to get me out of the city (Tucson) at the outset of the sixties. I had no choice. TV and the library (read a bazillion books) were my window to the world. Those four years were not fun. College saved me. I never went back to a farm. ;)

    Ex-Wife raised on a ranch in southwestern South Dakota. 5 miles to the mailbox. Town was 26 miles. Pine Ridge was closer. First time I went there I thought I was on the moon. One TV channel from Rapid City if everything was right.
  • edited October 2017
    I grew up south of St Louis in the county, 17 miles from downtown. Relatives asked my parents why they were moving to the country. We had 6 acres of open fields and woods behind us that we were allowed to play in. My dad cut an acre of it that we used to play softball and soccer every day. Funny you mentioned the library. We had to go with my mom to the laundromat twice a week and the county library was right across the street and had A/C which both our home and the laundromat did not. We spent lots of time at the library.

    I was so jealous of my cousins who lived in the city and could ride their bikes to the ball fields or playgrounds. There was only one person near my age on the street. Through the years, they built subdivisions around us and everyone who bought extra lots sold them. The 12 homes on this dead end street doubled and the street went though. So my parents bought property near a lake in SE Missouri. We built a house there and had electricity, power, and a well and direct access to the lake. It was awesome!

    I would say I enjoy the country much more than the city. The area I live in now has a small town feel. However, they are building homes on every vacant lot available. I'm afraid it will get very crowded very soon. But, I've already decided I'm not moving again so I will just enjoy it. I went kayaking with my son and daughter-in-law yesterday only a few blocks from my house. You can't do that on 30 Sep in most parts of the country. I'll let you all know how nice it is on Thanksgiving when many of you are buried in snow!
  • Speaking of TV reception, Friday, September 15, 1978, traveling east through Tennesee toward Gatlinburg on my motorcycle. Passed through Townsend and saw a nice motel around 4PM. Decided to stop early, get settled in and prepare to watch the rematch between Leon Spinks and Mohammed Ali. Checked into the motel, then walked across and down the street to a local cafe for dinner. Returned to the motel, showered and waited for the fight to begin. At the appointed time to watch the fight. turned on the (black and white) TV. Unfortunately, they only received two channels, neither of which carried the fight. If only I had continued the remaining 21 miles to Gatlinburg, before stopping, but, oh well. Got an early night sleep that night. :-(
  • Yeah, you didn't miss anything
  • TCEd, can you imagine moving from Arizona to Arkansas? I went years and years without any Mexican food. It was h@ll! :o
  • You didn't learn how to make your own?
  • edited October 2017
    You didn't learn how to make your own?

    These folks didn't have any concept of Mexican food, no tortillas, no taco shells, nothing except greasy wax wrapped tamales in a can. NW Arkansas was primitive in the early sixties. There was only one Mexican restaurant in Little Rock when I was in college during the late sixties. (As a freshman in HS I wasn't into cooking ;) )

    Now with many thousands of Hispanic immigrants there doing the jobs in the poultry industry that locals won't do, there are restaurants, bakeries and markets. When my language students threw a potluck it was Guacamole Heaven!
  • Yeah, I was wondering the other day who was going to rebuild hurricane damaged homes and pick the crops when all the immigrants are chased out of the country. I never thought about the chicken industry.

    Speaking of ethic food, the DC area is loaded with people from all countries of the world. They are there for politics and education. Everywhere you turned, there was another college. I went to a wings restaurant and the food was being cooked by Middle Easterners. Chinese might be cooked by Hispanics and Mexican by Americans. It was usually tasty but such a strange phenomenon.
  • "all the immigrants are chased out of the country" ?? Plenty of perfectly legal immigrants. They aren't going or being chased anywhere, thankfully. I love foods from around the world!
  • Since when does food have “ethics?” :-)
  • Jrobiso2 wrote: »
    "all the immigrants are chased out of the country" ?? Plenty of perfectly legal immigrants. They aren't going or being chased anywhere, thankfully. I love foods from around the world!

    Just wait. It will happen. The problem is we are all immigrants.
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