Empty your pockets! ( reach for the sky)

Cause you can ride no handed. Empty
your pockets b4 you ride. Unless you have deep pockets. I stopped a mile into our ride to adjust the air cushion and my small flashlight fell out of my swimming trunk pocket. Wait, my phone was in my pocket. Not now. We doubled back 1/2 mile and found it on the path. Never heard it impact. It has a hard case and a rubber boot around the perimeter. Prob landed on its edge.
So learn from me. Could have ended
differently.

Comments

  • I learned that lesson the hard way as well. I had a plastic pill case in my pocket and never did find it. My solution was to now put it, and other things, in a tall athletic sock which I put inside my waistband with the top hanging out and over. You can't depend on pockets in the recumbent position unless they happen to have a zipper.

    On one trike I had the cell phone in a mount on the handlebars, but on this trike I keep it in the trunk bag because I have no alternative for the moment. And, one advantage is that I have the phone attached to a power supply to keep it juiced because I'm tracking my rides on Strava. As the weather cools I'll farther and longer so plenty of power is good.
  • I put one of those handlebar bags on the strut of the frame on my Rover. I keep sweat bands, tools, and aspirin (just in case) in there. During each ride, I change to my prescription sunglasses and put the other glasses and my cell phone in there also. That bag really holds a lot!
  • I put one of those handlebar bags on the strut of the frame on my Rover. I keep sweat bands, tools, and aspirin (just in case) in there. During each ride, I change to my prescription sunglasses and put the other glasses and my cell phone in there also. That bag really holds a lot!

    Yes, when you start riding you lives and you learns. There as so many accessories available to fit every kind of trike and every kind of need. Bags are a necessity for a trike to hold all those items necessary for a complete ride.

    At this point I'll start another thread with this idea in mind...

  • The concealed nature of the ubiquitous belly bag (fanny pack worn to the front) carries all my "personal" gear. Zips up tight.
  • Plus, the belly bag gives you the "Aero-belly", reducing drag (if you don't already have a natural one)
  • Jrobiso2 wrote: »
    Plus, the belly bag gives you the "Aero-belly", reducing drag (if you don't already have a natural one)

    It also helps to keep the cold air off the "natural one". I've also been known to put something down in my compression pants to block the cold air from other places as well. TMI? ;)
  • Ice keeps swelling down.
  • So, TrikesterHal, you peddle in the cold
    months???
  • FINN58 wrote: »
    So, TrikesterHal, you peddle in the cold
    months???

    Yes, in NW Arkansas I rode all winter long. I did avoid riding in rain, ice or snow (I'm not crazy ;) ). As I think about it, I would ride against the wind outbound while my legs were fresh knowing I'd have a tailwind inbound when I was beginning to get tired. Within a mile or two of home my legs seemed to gain new strength. Maybe it was because my trike could smell the barn. :o

    Cold weather riding took some getting used to for sure. With my poorer circulation I would use "Hot Hands" warmers in my shoes on the colder days. I'd use both the sole warmers and toe warmers when it was really cold. It made a big difference.

    Oh, sweatpants do little to keep cold air out. I found some winter weight sweats at Sears that were supposed to be windproof. I tested them by putting my hand inside the material then trying to blow air through against my hand. They were nearly windproof. I was amazed and on my way to the checkout counter. :D What a difference that made. I don't know if I'll need them here in AZ but they're in the closet just in case.

    I used a nylon beenie under my helmet but I also had a balaclava that had a section of screen like material to breath through. Insulated gloves were good and I used work gloves that I bought at Walmart. Underneath everything I wore compression pants and tops.

    That hardest part was getting out of the recliner (boosting the warm kitty), suiting up and climbing on the trike. At times that was really, really difficult. :/

  • Riding in winter? Ask @TCEd about that one. Dude has pics of his trike next to a FROZEN water fountain from up north where he lives/hibernates.
  • Jrobiso2 wrote: »
    Riding in winter? Ask @TCEd about that one. Dude has pics of his trike next to a FROZEN water fountain from up north where he lives/hibernates.

    Winter riding can be fun as long as you dress correctly. My wife and I also cross country ski in the winter and find that clothing also works for riding.

    A word of caution for those winter riders, avoid asthma attacks in cold weather, wear some form of protection for your lungs. That crisp cold air can do damage.
  • Post the pics, post the pics!
  • Use studded tires?
  • Trails are prob packed down by the
    snowmobiles. Trails that are limestone
    anyway.
  • 0yrkbu5tqji4.jpg

    Here's a quick pic of my wife out on a snow covered trail last spring, sorry cannot find one of me right now. She had a tough time with those skinny tires but the snow was more slush and she plodded on. I kept spinning my rear wheel with skinny tire also.
  • 67lti458bp6q.jpg

    Changing things up a little. This is me and my iceboat in the background. Talk about cold, we sail up to around 65-70mph with the right wind conditions and clear ice.
  • 4nn3i188dqwo.jpg

    cross country skiing.
    ski.jpg 108.8K
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