Advantages

What are the advantages of the GT over the Rambler, if there are any ?I’m “turtle slow “ on the Rambler, about 6.5 mph. I am 69 years old , with diabetic legs. Most of my rides are 10-12 Miles, with my longest being 20 Miles this summer. Just wish I could have a faster average.

Comments

  • Where are you riding? On a bike path? Along a highway? What kind of surface?

    Sometimes going slower is safer.
  • Check your cadence. Faster cadence is easier on the legs/joints and may help to build up endurance and speed or perhaps you would find e-assist up your alley. GT may be faster potential for stronger legs but think getting more speed could be acheived on your Rambler if leg power is not the limitation. Make sure your tire pressures are right, your alignment is correct and your brakes are not dragging. On level pavement, unassisted, and w/o a head wind a consistent 10 mph should be relatively easy particularly as condition improves. What gear and tires are you running?
  • Like Squirrelpie0 said I'd first make sure your trike is set up correctly to include front wheel alignment, tire pressures near max, drive train lubed etc.. Are you mashing your pedals or pedaling at ease with a good cadence ?
    With your age and medical condition I'd go for endurance, not speed, you'll find it's healthier. Remember you're the engine regardless of what you're riding.
  • Thanks for the replies. I do have a cadence monitor, I just need to use it more often. I do tend to peddle faster, instead of fighting the pedals. I ride mostly on quiet paved roads, sub divisions and other quiet spots. I do have the trike checked over by my bike shop, a TT dealer, every year.After a two year hiatus I just restarted at the gym. Time on the thread mill and recumbent exercise bike several days a week over the winter should help my legs and biking too. I usually ride in the middle sprocket up front and in the mid range ( 4 or 5 ) in the rear on my Rambler.
  • And I’m riding on Marathon Supremes, at the 70 pound max.
  • It takes time to get the engine in tune.
  • So far, I am liking my research on this new triks. I think a fatter tire would be fantastic. Does anyone know how wide of a tire you could put "all around"?

    Glenn
  • edited November 2017
    Jeffh129 wrote: »
    What are the advantages of the GT over the Rambler, if there are any ?I’m “turtle slow “ on the Rambler, about 6.5 mph. I am 69 years old , with diabetic legs. Most of my rides are 10-12 Miles, with my longest being 20 Miles this summer. Just wish I could have a faster average.

    Jeff, my first trike was a Rambler GT purchased in August 2015 right after I retired from teaching. My GT came with the 26" rear wheel and 27 speed derailleur system (3 rings front, 9 rear). It was white with orange/black stripes. It had 20" & 26" Schwalbe Marathon tires (1.5" width, inflate to 100 psi). I rode "Tenacity" over 2,200 miles.

    I cataloged my experiences, thoughts, suggestions and such in my blog starting in January of 2016. I am trikesterhal.blogspot.com. There's much to read and I hope it will answer some of your questions as well as give you some ideas to further enjoy riding your TT.

    What I have learned from triking is:

    (1) It's easier on my body. It's comfortable and "butt" friendly. I'm 69, type 2 diabetic, and have bone spurs in one shoulder and had bypass surgery seven years ago. I'm out of warranty.

    (2) On a bike I was looking down at the road and flying down the street, well the last part may be a bit exaggerated. :# On the trike I was averaging 6 to 8 mph, enjoying the scenery, and being in the present moment. I could look up and around without worrying about crashing. Yes, there were times I could enjoy going downhill like when the steering got twitchy at 23 mph. And there was the time when I clipped the rattlesnake doing about 12 or 13 (I hoped it didn't hold grudges as I passed that way often). There were times when climbing was torturous and I resolved that by changing out the front crankset.

    (3) TCEd said it wisely about getting the engine in tune. I built up my stamina slowly over time. My distances increased slowly and I usually rode every other day things permitting. (Your mileage may vary.) Hang in there and feel what your body is telling you. In time, depending on the weather, I would pack a lunch, some cash, and some extra water. I'd be gone for as much as six hours. It was all about the ride. I began to use MapMyRide and finally Strava to track my rides (My best friend could track me real time on the Internet). Later I could go back, look at the route and see the terrain and read all the stats.

    (4) Above all enjoy riding your trike. Over time I experienced a lot, learned new things and enjoyed the wisdom, encouragement and camaraderie of all those who use this forum system. They are an excellent source of wisdom and encouragement. I thank Terra Trike for providing this service.
  • It takes longer to ride a trike but you are outside getting fresh air. No doctor will ever suggest you stop that unless you are not using proper sunscreen.

    I was riding last weekend and thinking that this was better spiritually than going to church. I clear my mind and exercise my body all at the same time.

    Maybe you need to find someone to ride with. Conversation passes the time quickly!
  • It takes longer to ride a trike but you are outside getting fresh air. No doctor will ever suggest you stop that unless you are not using proper sunscreen.

    I was riding last weekend and thinking that this was better spiritually than going to church. I clear my mind and exercise my body all at the same time.

    Maybe you need to find someone to ride with. Conversation passes the time quickly!


    I agree with the mind clearing, It usually takes me a few miles to get comfortable and a cadence established and then it's smooth riding with a calm and clear mind.
  • We r going to get out Monday. We can ride side by side. I enjoy that. And this time of year there are fewer souls braving the elements.
  • Hal, you said that your first trike was the Rambler GT. What came after that ? Thanks to everybody for their comments.
  • Jeffh129 wrote: »
    Hal, you said that your first trike was the Rambler GT. What came after that ? Thanks to everybody for their comments.

    Yes, after the Rambler GT came the Catrike 559. The transition seemed to come naturally after the 2.2K+ miles on the TT. I think I chose the TT initially because I was used to the grip shift on my Trek hybrid bike. I could see which gear I was in and I was used to the handlebar feel of the bicycle. The second reason for switching to a trike was the development of bone spurs in my shoulder. Riding a bike was just too painful and I think my cheeks were ready for a change as well. :s

    I went to the dealer (Ben Jones, Dogwood Junction in Siloam Springs, AR) and took a long test ride on the 559. I liked its lower center of gravity and the transition to vertical bars with bar end shifters came easily as well. I rode it 37 miles in the 2016 El Tour de Tucson.

    In January of 2017 Ben got in his first Catrike Dumont (only difference from the 559 was the inclusion of the full suspension). I rode it and it was love at first sight. It's a candy purple, therefore I named him DP (Deep Purple). Saturday the 18th I again rode 37 miles in El Tour de Tucson.

    I went to the same Lasco crankset on the 559 and the Dumont as described in my blog. I needed the lower gears and the shorter crank arms are much kinder to my knees (higher cadence works best for me).

    I agree totally with Florida_bound and TCEd on "mind clearing". Fresh air, exercise, focusing on the present moment while riding... It doesn't get any better than that. :)

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